The tenor Nicholas Phan, with his sweet,
clear voice, is on a career roll.

The New York Times

...Phan sings with a fine mixture
of poetry and strength…

Gramophone

A star in the making…exquisitely
artful…

The Sunday Times (London)

...an artist who must be heard.

National Public Radio

...the ravishing beauty of
his tone lingered in the ear.

Chicago Sun-Times

...vocally and dramatically at the level
of the finest international artists.

Chicago Sun-Times

An uncommonly dulcet lyric tenor…

Chicago Tribune

...a bright, confident tenor…

The Financial Times

The young American tenor possesses a lyric
instrument of exceptional quality…

Opera News

The artist behind the voice takes
complete possession of the music…

The Philadelphia Inquirer

Latest News

IN REPERTOIRE RANGING FORM BACH TO SONDHEIM, NICK LOOKS FORWARD TO AN ADVENTUROUS 2014-2015

“Fresh from a triumphant performance as Candide at the Tanglewood Festival, tenor Nicholas Phan launches his 2014-15 season in Chicago as Artistic Director of the Collaborative Works Festival, exploring the music of three great Romantics in “Love Songs: Clara Wieck, Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms.” Repertoire both earlier and more recent than the Romantic era rounds out a wide-ranging new season for the fast-rising Phan – “an artist who must be heard” (NPR) – highlighted by his return to the Cleveland Orchestra, as soloist in Bach’s monumental B-minor Mass with Franz Welser-Möst; his debut with the Dallas Symphony performing Britten’s Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings; a program of Bach Cantatas at the Kennedy Center with the National Symphony Orchestra and Helmuth Rilling; and a return to Houston Grand Opera for Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd. In March Phan returns to Carnegie Hall for his second solo recital, performing a pastiche song cycle of early English songs entitled A Painted Tale, which the tenor himself assembled and looks forward to recording for release in early 2015 on the Avie label…”
- 21C Media Group

NICK DEBUTS WITH THE BOSTON SYMPHONY AT TANGLEWOOD AS CANDIDE

“Tenor Nicholas Phan sang the title role as art song, intelligently mining the words to achieve great depth of feeling while never robbing the music of its sparkle. A seasoned Candide-ologist, I’ve never heard such a comprehensive characterization. It’s important, since no other characters show the scars inflicted by their adventures. Phan gave the show an anchor and a soul.”
- The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Leading the cast, tenor Nicholas Phan sang Candide with tonal purity and impeccable control…”
- Boston Globe

“Leading the marvelous cast was tenor Nicholas Phan as Candide. He sang with an open-faced innocence and note-perfect clarity. As his character’s travails wear on, his oh-so-gentle tone took on more edge and bite, which made the singing only more attractive.”
- Albany Times-Union

“For vocal excellence, highly-esteemed opera-house favorite Nicholas Phan (the only newcomer to Tovey’s cast) was an ideal Candide while soprano Anna Christy captured the essence of Cunegonde, the young lad’s love interest. Phan’s delicate, lyric tenor and sensitive phrasing created a sense of romantic ardor in his meditative soliloquies (‘It Must Be So’ and its reprise, ‘It Must Be Me’) and in Candide’s Lament. His wistful act two ‘Ballad of Eldorado’, with the TFC, summed up Candide’s quest for a peaceful oasis where he could live a simple farmer’s life with Cunegonde—an outcome of marital bliss foreshadowed in their frothy act one duet, ‘Oh Happy We.’”
- The Berkshire Eagle

“Nicholas Phan who has the best shot at a complete performance in the concert version, took full advantage of his time on stage. Singing beautifully, exquisitely in the soft passages, he gave us a complete character.”
- Berkshire Review for the Arts

NICK RETURNS TO THE OREGON BACH FESTIVAL FOR BACH, MONTEVERDI, MOZART, RACHMANINOV, & STRAUSS

Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610

“...A good group of solo singers was led by one great one, tenor Nicholas Phan, whose clarion timbre and passionate phrasing commanded attention every time he sang…”
- The Oregonian

Halls/Sackmann reconstruction of Bach’s St. Mark Passion

“...Tenor Nicholas Phan sang the Evangelist and an aria with dynamic variety, plaintive tone and occasional head voice over Halls on organ…Line of the night: After Jesus cries “Eli, Eli, lama asabthani?” the Evangelist translates: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Phan sang it with great tenderness…Best moment: Phan’s dramatic forte-to-pianissimo drop at “But Jesus cried aloud and died…”
- The Oregonian

“...The Evangelist must be the glue that holds the Passion drama together. As is traditional in almost all Passions, this “narrator” is a tenor who must sing a wide vocal and emotional range. Nicholas Phan has the voice and was superb in story telling and musicianship…”
- Oregon Arts Watch